Little Ice Age

The story of the Little Ice Age is one of winters so cold that rivers froze, summers so arid crops failed, and people so desperate that history changed. Who ever said a centuries long climatological phenomenon couldn’t make for a compelling story?

Acadians in Louisiana

After being forced out of their Canadian homeland, over 2,000 Acadians immigrated to Louisiana after almost a decade of exile in American colonies, England, and France. They made their home down on the bayou.

Expulsion of the Acadians

The Expulsion of the Acadians is a tale of complex alliances, uneasy neutrality, and the awful power of the British Empire at its height.

Purchase of Manhattan

The Dutch felt like they got a steal on the purchase of Manhattan. The Lenape they delt with, however, left that meeting with a very different impression.

Spanish Requirement of 1513

The Spanish Requirement of 1513 contained a twisted logic that enabled the slaughter of indigenous peoples across the Americas.

Quebec American Revolution

The Continental Congress attempted to convince their ‘friends and fellow subjects’ in Quebec to join in on the fun of the American Revolution. And they pulled out all the stops to flatter their amis to the north.

Nova Scotia American Revolution

Nova Scotia in the American Revolution: yes, it did almost happen! Though the idea of the original 13 has become sacrosanct, 14 damn near rebelled.

Canadian Martyrs

We’ve all read about those Europeans who came to the colonial Americas to live. But what of those who came to die? Among the more religiously minded colonists, especially those who belonged to the Society of Jesus, the notion of being a martyr, of joining the hallowed ranks of the early converts slaughtered in Roman coliseums, was an appealing one. Or, at least, so they claimed. 

Beaver Wars Mourning Wars

Two ideas, the Beaver Wars and the Mourning Wars, have defined the way we think of the Franco-Iroquoian conflicts of the sixteenth-century. Which is better?

Tar and Feathering American Revolution

Tar and feathering in the American Revolution was far more violent than it’s often made out. Could it be categorized as an act of terror?